Six e.l.f. Makeup Brushes You Should Own

posted on: November 28, 2013

Six e.l.f. brushes you should own

e.l.f. makeup brushes are some of the best on the market. Not only are they good quality, but they’re only $3. That’s right, $3. The brushes I’m going to talk about in this post are apart of the studio collection. (L-R in the image above):

  • e.l.f. Studio Small Angled Brush – This brush is mainly used for applying liquid or gel eyeliner. It helps to create a precise line exactly where you want it. (walgreens.com)
  • e.l.f. Studio Eyeshadow C Brush – This brush is mainly used for applying product to the eyelids, however it can also be used for the crease of the eyelid as well as for the brow bone highlight.  (walgreens.com)
  • e.l.f. Studio Concealer Brush – As the name implies, this brush is mainly used to apply and blend concealer. I prefer to use my fingers to put on concealer because I find that “patting” it on my face creates better coverage and trust me, I need it. After I pat the concealer on my face, I blend it in with a concealer brush (walgreens.com)
  • e.l.f. Studio Stipple Brush – This brush is mainly used to apply liquid foundation, however it can be used to apply blush. I wish this brush was bigger and more dense like the e.l.f. studio powder brush (see photo below for side by side comparison), but it’s really soft and my foundation is flawless when I use it. (walgreens.com)
  • e.l.f. Studio Angled Blush Brush – This brush is perfect for applying blush to the cheekbones or for applying contour to the hollows of the cheek, jawbone, and around the hairline. (walgreens.com,)
  • e.l.f. Studio Complexion Brush – This brush is used mainly to apply face powder to complete your makeup look. (walgreens.com)

Makeup brushes shed very easily if you don’t care for them properly. When washing them, do not soak them in water because this releases the glue used to secure the bristles. I experienced this with my kabuki brush (last photo below).

elf studio stipple brush elf kabuki face brush

  • TPTblog

    love this post! I use elf brushes too and swear by them. One thing I tried with my stipple brush was to cut off the white bristles. The black bristles are more dense, making the brush similar to the powder brush when you cut the white bristles. This worked a lot better for me as far as applying my makeup and getting better coverage, but I did have to sacrifice the softness of the white bristles; it might be worth it to have one regular stipple brush and another that you can cut. Hope that helps! xoxo

    • Brittany Basden

      Thanks for the tip! My stipple brush fell apart on me so I no longer have it. I now use the elf powder brush.